News​

CMU Experts Lead Conversations at World Economic Forum

By  Laura Kelly

 

 

What Facebook Facial Recognition can Mean for Your Privacy

 

 

Five Things to Consider Before Implementing Iris Scanning Technology

By  Val Van Brocklin

 

 

Five Things to Consider Before Implementing Iris Scanning Technology

By  Val Van Brocklin

 

 

This Startup Wants to Bring Face Recognition to All Kinds of Smartphones

By Rachel Metz

 

 

This Startup Wants to Bring Face Recognition to All Kinds of Smartphones

By Rachel Metz

 

 

iPhone X's Facial Recognition is Cool, but it's not the Future of Technology

By Marios Savvides

iPhone X's Facial Recognition is Cool, but it's not the Future of Technology

By Marios Savvides

Could your Iris be your iPhone's Next Passcode?

By Aaron Aupperlee

Passwords suck but Lip-reading Computers won't Save us

By Rob Verger

Passwords suck but Lip-reading Computers won't Save us

By Rob Verger

Biometrics could make Password Obsolete

By Adam Stone and Tobias Naegele

Japanese Biometric Startup Feels Future at its Fingertips

By Takashi Mochizuki

Japanese Biometric Startup Feels Future at its Fingertips

By Takashi Mochizuki

We Now Have the Tech to Fingerprint Babies, But Should We?

By Aviva Rutkin

We Now Have the Tech to Fingerprint Babies, But Should We?

By Aviva Rutkin

How Artificial Intelligence Can Stop Sex Trafficking

By Christina Couch

The other ‘Fingerprints’ you don’t know about

By Sandee Lamotte

The other ‘Fingerprints’ you don’t know about

By Sandee Lamotte

Carnegie Mellon Today, “Faces in the Crowd”

 

By Noël Um

DailyPlanet, Discovery Channel Canada

 

 

Facial Recognition Gets Better and New Uses Emerge

By Adam Stone

The Case for Biometrics

 

By Jennie Morton

Stolen Fingerprints put Biometrics Business at risk

 

By Sally Herships

No Face to Hide

 

By Gary Niederhoff

If we go to biometric IDs, will hackers try to steal your face?

 

By Jay MacDonald

Eye-scanners used to track terrorists adapted to help search for missing children like Madeleine McCann

 

By Kate Pickles

Eye-scanning tech used to track terrorists adapted to help find missing children

 

By Cristina Corbin

Carnegie Mellon to Collaborate with National Biometric Security Project

By  Andy Williams

 

 

Boston Manhunt

By  Miles O'Brian 

 

 

Face in the Crowd

By Leslie Stahl 

 

 

Biometrics Emerge as Passcode Alternative

 

By Rocio Labrador

Sorry, Criminals, Long-Range Iris Scanners Will Ruin Your Career

 

By J.E. Reich

New Tech Can ID you by your Eyes from 40ft Away

 

By Yuliya Geikhman

Iris Scanner can identify you in REFLECTIONS: Minority Report-style tech can be used up to 40ft away

 

By ANNE-MARIE OOSTVEEN and DIANA DIMITROVA

Will Latest CMU Invention Make Fingerprinting Obsolete?

 

By LELAINA ZACHOS

Long-Range Iris Scanning Is Here

 

Quoted: Privacy and security in the age of tracking, iris scanning and Biometrics

 

By Levi Sumagaysay

Iris Scanners, Widely Used By US Military Could Be Coming to a Police Department Near You

 

By JEFF STONE 

New Iris Recognition Tech Could Make It Easier To Catch Criminals -- Or Find Protesters

 

By Alexander Howard 

Iris Scanner Identifies a Person 40 Feet Away

 

By GLENN MCDONALD

Minority Report’ – like eye scanner works from 40ft away

 

By Douglas Ernst

Iris Eye Scanners Getting Longer Range

 

By Thom Patterson

CyLab Honored for Long-Distance Iris Scanner

 

By Alex Perala

New Iris Scanning Tech Could Identify You from 40 Feet Away

 

By LDaniel Bean

Carnegie Mellon’s CyLab Biometrics Center Named Edison Award Finalist

 

 

Your Eyes will Unlock Everything

 

By CHUCK SALTER

Nothin’s Ever Free. Read the Fine Print. Did you just give it away?

 

By jesse

Biometrics: New IDs that are uniquely you

 

By SHARON OOSTHOEK

School Districts Turns To Biometrics For Students Paying

 

By John Shumway

Cellphone authentication

 

 

Biometric Security Poses Huge Privacy Risks

 

By Oliver Munday

Embracing Big Brother: How Facial Recognition Could Help Fight Crime

 

By Jim Stenman

6 better Ways to Keep Airports Safe

 



Biometrics Emerge As PassCode Alternative

 

By Rocio Labrador

Protecting Online

 

By Sally Wiggin

Facial recognition technology moving toward identifying almost anyone

By Andrew Conte

 

 

Facial Recognition Technology

By CNN's Tom Foreman

 

Facial Recognition Technology in Boston failed. However, the Facial Recognition and Image Enhancement work at CMU Biometrics Center is going change how Law Enforcement works, giving them tools and capabilities that will help investigations....

How Facial Recognition Tech Could Help Trace Terrorism Suspects

By Tom Simonite April 18, 2013

 

“Many cases today, like in Boston and other crimes, law enforcement have low-resolution, off-angle images they can’t do anything with,” says Savides, “but we can change that.”.....

Security on the (Eye)Ball: Hands-Free Iris Biometrics to Keep Bad Guys at Bay

Carnegie Mellon University CyLab researchers are developing an iris-scanning system that will capture and compare iris images at up to 12 meters away

By Larry Greenemeier

 

Biometric security systems that can identify individuals à la Minority Report based on the unique patterns in their irises have been touted as a fast, accurate and efficient way to control access to sensitive information and facilities. But until now, their reach has literally been limited.

 

Researchers are working on this problem by developing technology that will not only enable iris scanning at distances of up to about 12 meters, but will also simultaneously scan a person's face to more accurately identify those seeking access. Iris and facial recognition should be part of the same biometric identification system, says Marios Savvides, a Carnegie Mellon University professor of electrical and computer engineering who directs the school's CyLab Biometrics Center in Pittsburgh.

Cellphone Can Tell if you are not its owner by the way you walk

By Jim Giles

 

Could you tell if a phone has been stolen by a change in the walking pattern of the person carrying it? An Android app developed by Marios Savvides and colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, uses data from the accelerometer......

DoD Awards $1.5 Million Grant for CyLab Iris Recognition Research 

By Mike Cronin

 

"The CyLab Biometrics Lab, led by Marios Savvides, continues to make a significant contribution to this vital field; and in particular to the development of iris recognition systems." 

Carnegie Mellon University Tapped To Join New
Center For Academic Studies In Identity Sciences

 

PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's Marios Savvides is one of four researchers selected to be part of a new Center for Academic Studies In Identity Sciences (CASIS), a Center of Academic Excellence (CAE), under the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI). This is the ODNI's first CAE created as a pilot with an emphasis on science and technology.

 

Carnegie Mellon Researchers Lead Collaborative Team Developing Digital Mapping of Poisonous Plants

 

Carnegie Mellon University researchers and a botany expert from Carnegie Museum of Natural History are developing a digital system for identifying poisonous plants.

 

"These plants are in our backyards and often wind up on our patios and even in our living rooms to add color during drab winter weather, so we really need to be aware of their impact on our health," said  Marios Savvides, director of the CyLab Biometrics Center at CMU.

Carnegie Mellon Today - Photogenic

By Jennifer Bails 

 

 

 

CyLab seeks to map poisonous plants for better treatment

By Desiree Xu



Two scientists have collaborated with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) and the Poison Control Center, which currently use a medical toxicology book and the Micromedics database, UPMC’s medical database for poisonous plants....

 

CMU Developing Terrorist-Fighting Tool



PITTSBURGH — Carnegie Mellon University researchers are developing facial recognition technology that may soon help protect American soldiers...

 

FBI launches $1 billion face recognition project

By  Sara Reardon -Sept 2012

Algorithms such as one developed by Marios Savvides's lab at Carnegie Mellon can analyse features of a front and side view set of mugshots, create a 3D model of the face, rotate it as much as 70 degrees to match the angle of the face in the photo.....

Savvides develops facial, iris recognition

By  Jennifer Tharp

The Carnegie Mellon Biometrics Lab, led by electrical and computer engineering research scientist Marios Savvides, is exploring ways to improve facial and iris recognition technology through support from agencies such as the Department of Defense (DoD).....